Posts

Keeping my cryptos secure with the Ledger Nano S

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I just received the Ledger Nano S hardware wallet. As my crypto portfolio is growing I thought it was time to buy a hardware wallet. I will make some follow up videos on how I set it up.



Ledger Nano attestation security demo The Ledger Nano S came packaged without a seal and just had some foil rapping. If you watched my video you know I was a bit suprised about that. But all was soon cleared up as I opened the packaging and read the "Dit you notice?" message. Here is the video I mention and that explains how your Ledger Nano S is verified each time you connect it.



Link to learn more about genuine Ledgerwallets: http://www.ledgerwallet.com/genuine


Making the Ledger Nano S connect on Ubuntu
Setting up de Nano S is easy. I just followed the instructions on screen and I looked at http://start.ledgerwallet.com. After setup was done I tried to connect the Nano S to the browser wallet, but it did not connect. A quick search found me the solution at https://ledger.zendesk.com/hc/e…

Lend out crypto currencies for passive returns

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Did you know you can make interest on your Crypto currency holdings by lending them out? In this post and video I show you how I do this and why.


Why? Here are some of the reasons why I lend a portion of my crypto holdings.

Passive returns
Earning interest on your crypto currency holdings is almost just like any other loan. You don't have to actively trade to make a return on investment. Also if you hodle coins, this is a way to make some extra passive income on your holdings.High yields possible
Some coins offer at times extremely high yields, but most of the times just high yields. BTC can be loaned out at an average rate of 7% per year or more and the US-Dollar mostly above 20% annually.

Of course with high yields come higher risks, then with your average savings account. Basically there are two types of risks that you are opening yourself up to:

Counter party risk
- Lending out your crypto currency on an exchange means you will lose control over your private keys as you need to ho…

How to install Google Drive Sync on Ubuntu 16.04 and higher

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Google drive is one of the many handy tools Google offers. It is a file synchronization tool that allows you to backup, store and share and access files in the cloud. I use it to collaborate on files with others or to sync movies that I can then easily publish on Youtube.



Unfortunately there is no native Google drive software for Linux Desktops. Luckily there is a way to have a proper sync setup on Ubuntu 16.04 and higher that uses the Google drive API and some Gui tools. Let me show you how I have this installed on my Ubuntu Desktop.

First I install the Grive2 commandline tool:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:nilarimogard/webupd8
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install grive

No need to set it up right now. Instead let's first install grive-tools. This is a package that is only available up to Ununtu Vivid, but I have found that is works just the same on Ubuntu 16.04
Run the following from a terminal:

sudo su -c "nano /etc/apt/sources.list.d/thefanclub*.list"
deb http://ppa.lau…

Getting into crypto currencies and block chain technology

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It was in 2011 that I first picked up on something like Bitcoin as a digital currency. In 2013 my brother and I decided to buy some of this digital currency via a US based startup: Coinbase. I finally did not buy any, because ultimately I decided it was all a load of hot air, a bubble. My brother decided to try his luck and bought bitcoins worth of 50 USD. He made a backup of his Coinbase wallet and then forgot about it. Then Coinbase got hacked and all wallets were stolen. anyone without a backup just lost all their money. And I was thinking, I was right to call this a scam.

The internet of value Fast forward to today and I can say how wrong I was to think this. Today I understand that block chain technology and crypto currencies are not (always) a scam. In fact, I believe the underlying technology will change the way we run our economies, the same way the internet and mobile devices changed the way we communicate. I believe that block chain technology will facilitate the internet o…

Learn how to code with Python - Lesson 5 - Basics wrapup

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In this lesson I bring together the few basics discussed in the previous videos and this video. To do this I will discuss one more important principle in programming and that is:

Datatypes

I have already introduced some datatypes like strings, integers and floats. But there are more types you need to know about before we can continue.

Learn how to code with python: Lesson 4 - Reading and writing files

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One of the most useful things to know how to do when just learning how to program, is knowing how to read and write text files. In this video I show you how to do just that.

Example code from the video:



>>> f = open('Desktop/lorumipsum.txt')
>>> print(f)
<_io.TextIOWrapper name='Desktop/lorumipsum.txt' mode='r' encoding='UTF-8'>
>>> f.readline()
'Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet,....

>>> f.read()
'\nEtiam rhoncus....
...metus at tortor pulvinar varius.\n'
>>>
>>> f = open('Desktop/lorumipsum.txt')
>>> f.readlines()
['Lorem ipsum dolor...


Learn how to code with python: Lesson 3 - Working with numbers

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Below is lesson number 3 in the series: Learn how to code with Python. In  this lesson I explain the basic things you need to know to start working productively with numbers in Python.

In the video I talk about the different types of numbers:

Integers, or int in PythonFloating point number, or float in Python
You can use the python type() function to see the type a number holds.